Reduce server response times (TTFB)

When we talk about website performance, one of the ways to improve the performance is by reducing the server response time, also known as Time To First Byte (TTFB).

The server response time is considered as the time taken to reply to a request initiated by a user. When any user sends a request to view a page on a website, the server has to do multiple operations before sending the output back to the user, it may include mathematical and logical operations. These operations take some time to execute, this time taken to respond to a user’s request is known as server response time.

For example, if a user is looking to check his transaction history for the last year, the server will have to generate a list of all the transactions done within the given time period from the database and then push it into the page. This can take time and can lead to a greater response time.

How to reduce server response time?

To reduce the server response time, one needs to follow the basic steps as mentioned below:

  • Start by identifying the core task that your server needs to perform before providing the first output.
  • Identify the task taking the longest time to complete, and then try to optimize it or if possible use a different approach to run it. For example, if you are loading blog posts, you can either load all the posts at a time or can show the latest 5 at the time of page load and do ajax calls to load the rest of them when the user scrolls the page.
  • User a good server, which provides more processing capacity, more process threads, for hosting your website. One of the good web hosting providers is CLOUDPOKO
  • If you are using a dedicated server or your own server to host your website, you should upgrade the hardware to meet the processing requirements.
  • Try to make fewer database calls as much as possible, this will reduce the server busy time. As your customer base grows, if too many database calls are done, your customers may get lags in getting responses.

To check your servers response time, you can visit – https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/

Here you’ll be able to check the speed of all your website pages using Google’s Lighthouse report. Analyzing the report you’ll be able to find the changes required enhance the performance of your website.

Must Read
How to enhance improve website performance
How to improve website speed

If you find this article useful, do share it on your social media feeds, it will be a great support and will help to boost our morale to bring similar posts for everyone.

Online Support

What is technical support?

Online tech support is assistance provided to customers online (over the web). It helps customers solve technical problems or issues that they are experiencing with electronic devices or software.

How do we offer technical support?

Live tech support is delivered through different channels. For instance; email, phone calls, or online tech support chat. In order to provide excellent technical support, we use a ticketing system which is an online tool to lodge a ticket from anywhere and our team gets back to you in no time.

What parts does our technical support software consist of?

Mail

Every ticket raised is properly distributed among our team so that the response time is reduced and the user also gets a confirmation of the ticket raised. Once any update is done on the ticket, it is again notified to the client, to make the work more transparent and user friendly.

Tech support Chat

We provide support over WhatsApp/Facebook/Signal chats too. Once you raise a ticket, to make it more user friendly, we make sure that the client is communicated properly on each stage of time. And clearity of the work is even more necessary at each point in time. To ensure faster service, we do provide chat support over social networks.

Calls

The fastest way out to clear any doubt or query, or to make the issues more clear we interact with clients directly over calls too. This helps us serve the clients in the fastest possible way.

Contact forms

We do have contact forms available where a client can raise an indent and our team will get in touch with the client using the above-mentioned mode to rectify the issues/queries.

Feedback

We provide feedback forms to all our clients to provide their reviews/feedback on the service they received. This makes us in improving the quality of service for each and every client. We take feedback very seriously.

Are you looking for online tech support services?
Get in touch with us here

Start Your First Blog Today!

Are you a writer ? Or you like sharing your stuffs with friends ?
Or you are a micro-blogger who posts stuff on Facebook and Twitter ?
Everyone who likes sharing write-ups, videos, images etc, are now switching to a better section, BLOGS! Are you also looking to start your first blog ? We can help you do it today!

Before we move forward, we should understand what a blog is and who use it or who write it! and who read it!

Definition of blog

A blog (shortening of “weblog”) is an online journal or informational website displaying information in the reverse chronological order, with the latest posts appearing first. It is a platform where a writer or even a group of writers share their views on some subject.

The content of a blog typically includes text, pictures, videos, animated GIFs and even scans from old physical offline diaries or journals and other hard copy documents. Since a blog can exist merely for personal use, sharing information with an exclusive group or to engage the public, a blog owner can set their blog for private or public access.

meaning of “blog”

Who writes a blog ?

The answer is simple! anyone can start a blog who want to share any sort of information online. Generally, news channels, journalists, technical geeks, politicians, writers, teachers, students and other professionals write a blog.

Blogger writing a blog

Anyone who writes on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or any other social site should start their own blog. It will be personal and highly customizable. On a social blogging sites you don’t get options to customize your content properly, you have restrictions over writing content. But when you use your own blog, you feel the freedom of customization, and can personalize the entire blog.

You can write content, post images, videos, documents etc. whatever you like. Your blogs can be one stop solution for stuffs like education, political etc. stuffs.

Who reads a blog ?

Almost everyone who surfs on internet reads a blog. It can be either a micro-blog like Twitter or a complete blog like Your-story.

If you search over internet, any content, you get write-up over websites that belongs to different blog categories.

Jotting stuffs from a blog

Students search for online tutorials and land over different blogging sites that provide write-ups, video lectures, etc You can create a blog to teach stuffs online. You can create blog dedicated to some topic like this one – Javascript

How to start a blog ?

There can be different ways to start a blog! Many can suggest to start from free platforms like blogger. But we will not!

How to Start a blog

If you are planning to start a blog, you should set a long term goal with it. A blog is not only to share information, it also creates your presence over internet. You can also earn selling the content of your blogs. Multiple options like posting advertisements on the blog can also be an option to earn.

You should opt for setting up your own website, rather using a blow with blogger or some other site. As said earlier, a blog is build for setting up freedom to the blogger. If you opt for setting up your blogs with a some fixed blog, you will get fixed functionality.

To start, you need to choose a good name and search for domain name availability. You can search for domain here.

Once you find a good name, you should opt for setting up your web blog. To setup a blog, you should purchase a hosting. You can search for good hosting plans and SSL here.

Once you have bought the requirements, you are ready to go with setting up your first blog.

Install WordPress on your hosting. To learn more about installing WordPress on the hosting, follow the steps mentioned in this blog post

Once you are done with the installation, you can start setting up your blog information by visiting your domain name and you are ready to go with your first blog post.

If you are looking for support, you can connect with us and get help from professionals here, You can also ask for quotes from our team here

Our team will be happy to setup your first blog.

How to install WordPress in CentOS Web Panel (CWP)

Using CWP hosting? Looking to setup a your own blog ? Need to install WordPress in your account ?

If you are using a CWP hosting and want to install WordPress in your account, then it is too simple. You can install WordPress following the simple steps as mentioned below.

To install WordPress from CWP:

  1. Log in to your CWP user account
  2. On the dashboard look for the WordPress icon (Addons section) and click on it
  3. Configure the options:
    – choose the protocol you want to use (https if you want to use SSL), also if you want to access your site with www or not.
    – choose the domain(you can have multiple domains on the same CWP account) on which you want to install WordPress
    – enter the desired directory – leave the field empty if you don’t want to install WP in a directory.
    – enter the database name – CWP will automatically fill this field – you can let is as it is
    – enter database username (this IS NOT the WordPress admin username)
    – database password – enter a strong password.
  4. Click the Install button. Wait for a few seconds and access the site on which you wanted to install WordPress. Now you just have to enter some WP settings (like language, admin username, password and email etc.)
  5. Your WordPress installation is live now

If you are looking for better support, you can connect with us here

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)

What is RDP?

RDP, also known as the Remote Desktop Protocol is a specially designed tool to access and use a remote desktop over intranet or internet using some specific port.

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a proprietary protocol developed by Microsoft, which provides a user with a graphical interface to connect to another computer over a network connection. The user employs RDP client software for this purpose, while the other computer must run RDP server software.

5 Benefits of Using RDP:

  1. Deliver solutions to devices that may not have the processing power or capacity to run the applications natively.
  2. Deliver Windows based applications to iOS, Android, Windows and even thin client devices.
  3. Provide more compute resources to an application without having to upgrade everyone’s devices. This gives you the ability to reduce the cost of the end user devices knowing that when users need more compute power, the compute power can be associated with the actual workloads that need it.
  4. Data can be stored in the cloud. If the end user device fails, or is lost or stolen, your data remains safe.
  5. Configuration time is greatly reduced for new devices. Since the applications or desktop are delivered from the cloud and not are not stored on the local device, once a new device is setup, users can just reconnect to their remote apps or desktops and go back to work.

Features of RDP

  • 32-bit color support. 8-, 15-, 16-, and 24-bit color are also supported.
  • 128-bit encryption, using the RC4 encryption algorithm, as of Version 6.. TLS support since version 5.2.
  • Audio Redirection allows users to process audio on a remote desktop and have the sound redirected to their local computer.
  • File System Redirection allows users to use their local files on a remote desktop within the terminal session.
  • Printer Redirection allows users to use their local printer within the terminal session as they would with a locally- or network-shared printer.
  • Port Redirection allows applications running within the terminal session to access local serial and parallel ports directly.
  • The remote computer and the local computer can share the clipboard.

Microsoft introduced the following features with the release of RDP 6.0 in 2006:

  • Seamless Windows: remote applications can run on a client machine that is served by a Remote Desktop connection. It is available since RDP 6.
  • Remote Programs: application publishing with client-side file-type associations.
  • Terminal Services Gateway: enables the ability to use a front-end IIS server to accept connections (over port 443) for back-end Terminal Services servers via an https connection, similar to how RPC over https allows Outlook clients to connect to a back-end Exchange 2003 server. Requires Windows Server 2008.
  • Network Level Authentication
  • Support for remoting the Aero Glass Theme (or Composed Desktop), including ClearType font-smoothing technology.
  • Support for remoting Windows Presentation Foundation applications: compatible clients that have .NET Framework 3.0 support can display full Windows Presentation Foundation effects on a local machine.
  • Rewrite of device redirection to be more general-purpose, allowing a greater variety of devices to be accessed.
  • Fully configurable and scriptable via Windows Management Instrumentation.
  • Improved bandwidth tuning for RDP clients.
  • Support for Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 on both server and client ends (can be negotiated if both parties agree, but not mandatory in a default configuration of any version of Windows).
  • Multiple monitor support for allowing one session to use multiple monitors on the client (disables desktop composition)

Release 7.1 of RDP in 2010 introduced the following feature:

  • RemoteFX: RemoteFX provides virtualized GPU support and host-side encoding; it ships as part of Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Myths About RDP!

As the use of RDP increased, it increased the myths about the RDP too. So we gathered some studies that are officially confirmed by Microsoft RDP team too, and have jotted down 10 myths about RDP

1) RDP is pretty slow because it has to scrape the screen and can only send giant bitmaps

This is a common misconception. While many alternative protocols are principally screen scrapers, RDP uses sophisticated techniques to get much better performance than can be obtained with a simple screen scraping approach.

To drill into this it helps to first talk a little about what screen scraping really means (i.e. what RDP does not do today) and why it can be slow:
In a screen scraping protocol the server side has to ‘poll’ screen contents frequently to see if anything has changed. Screen scraping polling involves frequent and costly memory ‘scrapes’ of screen content and then scanning through a lot of memory (a typical 1600×1200 by 32bpp screen is about 7MB of data) to see what parts may have changed. This burns up a lot of CPU cycles and leaves the protocol with few options but to send large resulting bitmaps down to the client.

So what does RDP do different today and why is it faster?

RDP uses presentation virtualization to enable a much better end-user experience, scalability and bandwidth utilization. RDP plugs into the Windows graphics system the same way a real display driver does, except that, instead of being a driver for a physical video card, RDP is a virtual display driver. Instead of sending drawing operations to a physical hardware GPU, RDP makes intelligent decisions about how to encode those commands into the RDP wire format. This can range from encoding bitmaps to, in many cases, encoding much smaller display commands such as “Draw line from point 1 to point 2” or “Render this text at this location.”

To illustrate some of the benefits on CPU load, terminal servers today can scale to many hundreds of users. In some of our scalability tests we see that even with hundreds of users connecting to one server running knowledge worker apps (e.g. Word, Outlook, Excel) the total CPU load consumed by RDP to encode and transmit the graphics is only a few percent of the whole system CPU load!

With this approach RDP avoids the costs of screen scraping and has a lot more flexibility in encoding the display as either bitmaps or a stream of commands to get the best possible performance.

2) RDP uses a lot of bandwidth

In many common and important scenarios such as knowledge worker applications and line of business app centralization RDP’s bandwidth usage is very low (on the order of Kbps per user depending on the app and scenario).

This is certainly much lower than many of the screen scraping approaches can hope to achieve (see point #1 above). More importantly it’s low enough that it provides a good experience for many users sharing the same network and datacenter infrastructure even when over a slow network.

So why has there been a perception that RDP uses a lot of bandwidth?

This is a good question and the answer probably lies in the fact that RDP does not use a constant amount of bandwidth; it actually tries to reduce bandwidth usage to 0 when nothing is changing on the screen. Bandwidth consumption only goes up in proportion to what is changing on screen. For instance, if you just run a line of business app with basic graphics and not much animation you may end up sending just a few Kbps of bandwidth down the wire. Of course if you start running animation-heavy applications or graphics your bandwidth usage will go up to support that scenario.

So let’s illustrate some sample bandwidth usages for RDP6.1 in common scenarios (data is from the RDP Performance Whitepaper ).

RDP bandwidth usage chart

Your mileage will vary depending on your application and network conditions, so it’s important to actually measure empirically for your scenario but the whitepaper gives useful general trends.

3) Myth: I can’t get the same rich experience I get locally when working over RDP

This is also a misconception. RDP provides a scalable remoting experience. By default it cuts down on rich effects in the desktop and application experience in order to preserve bandwidth and save on server load (e.g. CPU, memory). However, if you want the highest end user experience it is possible to turn on many rich effects and display enhancements such as:

  • · ClearType
  • · Wallpaper
  • · The Aero theme with full glass and 3D effects (when connecting to Vista with RDP 6.1)
  • · 32-bit per pixel color

The key to enabling many of these effects is to run the Remote Desktop client, click Options, and then click the Experience tab. Here you can select and enable many high-end features. Note that in some cases your admin might have controlled access to these features with server-side group policies.

In many cases you can get a great end user experience with good parity to the local case.

We’re also constantly working to ‘close the gap’ between the local and remote experience and so we’re looking to improve the remote experience even more in future versions.

4) RDP can’t be tuned to get better performance

This is again a misconception. RDP has a set of defaults that tries to provide the best balance between bandwidth usage, the remote user experience, and server scalability. However, you can override many settings if you want to manually tune for a specific scenario and in some cases get very significant boosts in performance.

TIP: One of my favorite such settings is the ability to set policy on the server to optimize RDP compression. This can give you a boost of as much as 60% bandwidth improvement over previous versions of RDP. The tradeoff here is that you’d be consuming more server resources (such as memory and possibly CPU) to achieve that bandwidth reduction.

The GP to control this is :

Administrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsTerminal ServicesTerminal ServerRemote Session Environment“Set compression algorithm for RDP data”

There is more information on tuning the bulk compressor as well as other RDP-tunable parameters such as cache sizes in the RDP Performance Whitepaper .

5) Using lower color depths — e.g. 8bpp — gives the best end user experience

This is a common misconception and was historically true, but not anymore!

The first version of RDP only supported 8bpp color. However, ever since Windows XP, RDP has supported up to 32bpp color.

The reason for this is that more and more apps have come to expect 32bpp mode as the default. Even the Windows Aero experience requires it.

Rather than deny this trend and create a difference between the local and remote experiences, we put a lot of effort into optimizing the 32bpp case to bring down its cost. This allows the user to have the flexibility to pick what is best for their scenario without necessarily having to incur a much bigger bandwidth cost.

In general I’d recommend attempting to run your scenario at 32bpp and measuring the resulting bandwidth to see if it’s acceptable for your scenario. It will usually give the best visual experience and in several cases will consume only a small percentage more data than 16bpp.

6) RDP is insecure; there is no encryption

To be clear, this is totally false! RDP has always supported strong encryption and is by default encrypted!

What has changed over the releases is the type of encryption we offer. The very first versions of RDP back in the Windows 2000 era had encryption that was based on SSL.

As early as Windows 2003 SP1 RDP we decided to introduce full-blown standards-based encryption (i.e. the same SSL as your browser uses to connect to your bank). SP1 did this by introducing standard SSL-encryption as an option.

Current versions of RDP have even stronger encryption and server authentication options out of the box. This is because they are built on top of a security mechanism in Windows called CredSSP which uses Kerberos or TLS (aka SSL) for authentication – when you use those settings RDP is using the same or stronger encryption that your browser uses when communicating with your bank.

7) RDP performance hasn’t changed much over the releases

False! We’re constantly working to improve RDP performance as well as adding a lot of great functionality to RDP in terms of features.

Every release since Windows 2000 has seen improved perf, i.e. there is a real benefit to upgrading to the latest client and server (e.g. RDP 6.1).

Here’s just one example of the bandwidth difference for a common scenario across several releases of RDP. We essentially have in these scenarios gains of between 8% to 45% bandwidth improvement from switching to the latest protocol. See the RDP Performance Whitepaper for more details on this data.

Going forward – We’re hard at work to continue that trend and bring even better innovations and improved remote experiences – see Asael’s post on some of the future upcoming improvements.

8) RDP is only used in Remote Desktop Services (formerly TS)

RDP is actually used under the hood in pretty much every Microsoft product that benefits from desktop or application remoting.

Just some examples of products or features you may not have known were built on top of RDP for their remoting needs:

  • · Remote Assistance
  • · Windows Media Center Extenders use RDP internally (including Xbox360)
  • · Windows Live Mesh
  • · Hyper-V Virtual Machine console
  • · Office Communications Server 2007 R2
  • · System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

If you’re interesting in seeing how RDP might be able to fit within your application, see the next point…

9)I can’t customize or program extensions to RDP

There are actually several useful ways to extend/or customize RDP:

  • · Programming the RDP Client: Host the RDP ActiveX control in your web page or application.

The Remote Desktop client in Windows is a great example of an application that hosts the RDP ActiveX control. This control is fully documented in MSDN . It’s possible for 3 rd party software developers to host this control in an app or a web page to provide desktop remoting as part of your larger app.

· Programming the RDP Server side: Use the Windows Desktop Sharing API

This blog post by Seenu has a lot of good detail and examples on how you can use our Windows Desktop Sharing API to write custom collaboration or desktop sharing applications, these APIs are all built on the same core RDP protocol that powers Windows Remote Desktop.

· Write a dynamic virtual channel extension to RDP

Probably the most powerful way to extend RDP is to actually write a virtual channel plug-in extension to RDP. This allows you to extend the protocol with your own bi-directional channel that can communicate from client to server. The possibilities are limitless but some examples include supporting new devices over RDP. We have a nice blog post with an overview of the dynamic virtual channel API or the docs are in MSDN .

10)The RDP protocol is not publicly documented

If you’re curious to learn more about very low-level technical details of RDP, we have thousands of pages of detailed specifications up on MSDN. For example, you can see the documents for the core protocol sequence and basic graphics here .

Moving forward,

Are you looking to setup a RDP?

Our team can help you setting up a Remote Desktop at cheaper rates and provide you a highly available PC.

You can opt to get a Remote Desktop by connecting with us here

Virtual Private Network (VPN)

Virtual Private Networks are the new age technologies which allows you to bring you to your Local Area Network (LAN) whenever you need it. A VPN can be used to get access to an office / home network in a more secure way.

VPN, as its name suggests, creates a private network over internet. It uses high end encryption technologies to secure data transfer over internet, while it also provides you with the access of you remote local area network.
Read more about VPN here

Who uses VPN?

We have jotted down small list of the people who commonly use VPN’s, along with the specific benefits they experience from it. Chances are, you fall at least partially into one of the categories below.

Office Workers

While you are using a open network or your own personal WiFi connection, you can be at risk . Other people can have access to your activities and may even be able to steal your account information. business data, research data, etc. which can lead to risk of job or grades.

Generally, companies provide VPN to their employees so that they have easy access to data and connection, even while traveling, to the resources that they might not have in another network. If you are using a VPN even in public places, you can rest assured that your important work is protected from prying eyes and your data is safe. Office workers use VPN on a large scale based on different reasons.

Security Enthusiasts

No matter your profession or internet needs, you deserve the privacy and security that a VPN can provide. Using a VPN, you can:

  • Search anonymously without the threat of your activity being traced or tracked
  • Keep your network safe from hacking by identity thieves, malware, and/or neighbors who don’t want to pay for their own Internet
  • Get a secure connection so that your communications remain private and encrypted, whether you’re at home or in a public space
  • Shield your personal and financial data from prying eyes

So if your neighbor keeps pilfering your internet, possibly even downloading viruses or malware to your server, or if your teenager accidentally entered your credit card information into a suspicious site, or even if you’re just uncomfortable with the idea of anyone seeing your personal data or online activity, you should be using a VPN.

Travelers

Because of time differences, language barriers, and government censorship, internet use while abroad can be slow and frustrating. Rather than relying on an unfamiliar, unsecured local network, using a VPN while traveling eliminates those hurdles (as well as any security issues) and allows you to access any website at the speed you want in the language you want.

Businesses and Websites

Whether you own a small startup or are part of a large corporation, VPNs help secure private business data. From scheduling, payroll, product catalogs, employee and customer information, company projections, and more, your data is protected and secure. Companies commonly use VPNs for privacy reasons, but also for secure and convenient data sharing between offices, and for connecting remote employees to central work servers. Websites use them to prevent malware from affecting its users and to ensure a fast load time.

People everywhere are using VPNs, and the numbers are growing. With increasing censorship, cyber crime, and speed demands, VPNs save the day for students, businesses, travelers, downloaders, and regular people.

Types of VPN

There are two major type of VPN

  • Site to Site VPN – Also known as Router to Router VPN or Peer to Peer VPN. This type of VPN is used by companies to connect with different branch offices. In this scenario, all the branches of the company comes in a single network, which makes it easy for lot of tasks to take place. Generally, companies use Pees to Peer VPN for the following:
    • File sharing over private and secured network
    • Providing access to equipment over private network
    • Access to LAN based certificates and licenses
    • Intranet communication
    • Inter office communication / connection
Site to Site VPN
  • Remote Access VPN – A remote-access VPN allows individual users to establish secure connections with a remote computer network. Those users can access the secure resources on that network as if they were directly plugged in to the network’s servers. Generally organizations having field staff who report over intranet tools are provided with the remote access VPN. Organization use the remote access VPN to allow users:
    • Access files
    • Access resources
    • Reporting
    • Monitoring
    • Internet access
    • Server sharing
Remote Access VPN

If you are owner of a business, and you require a better and a secure connection for your employees. High availability of your intranet resources and data. Then you should opt for getting a Virtual Private Netowrk setup. This will not only protect your data but also enhance the productivity of your workforce.

Even in situations like #CoronaEffect, your office will be up and running. Your workforce will be working from home over your own office network.

To get your VPN setup done. You can connect with use anytime. Just write to us, or give us a call. Get our contact details here

INNOVATION AND ACCELERATOR

Innovation is defined simply as a “new idea, device, or method”. However, innovation is often also viewed as the application of better solutions that meet new requirements, un-articulated needs, or existing market needs. This is accomplished through more-effective products, processes, services, technologies, or business models that are readily available.

Here at M/s VIKASH TECH, team assesses every situation to optimize the efforts and provide value to the customer. M/s VIKASH TECH team has developed several innovations to enhance testing process. These innovations have helped to reduce effort, generate benefits and ease out our day to day testing work.

Our team has developed customized tools that meet requirements of almost all the businesses and can enhance productivity.  At M/s VIKASH TECH, we are developing tools that can help our clients to enhance their business, and get more productivity in low time investment. Clients who are interested in getting their stuffs automated may connect with our team anytime to get a better solution for their work. 

Our team is also working for overseas clients. So, if you are reading this from a country other than India, feel free to write to us on support@vikashtech.com, Our team will be happy working with you. We will ensure proper service / product delivery to you.