How to secure your home network?

Securing a home network is a big concern nowadays. As the world is moving towards the beautiful virtual world, there are certain that are not too good for everyone at home. Everything has two sides, the good and the bad. We are always expecting the good, but we should also consider the bad.

Here in this blog, we will talk about securing our home network and our family from the bad in the virtual world.

To secure your home network, you’ll need to add an additional device “Firewall” at the internet terminating point. This will help you go ahead with the security aspects of your network. You can choose simple, pocket friendly, and easy to use firewalls like “MythGuard MGF001 – Mini Firewall

There are following ways to secure the home network

  • Analise all the network traffic going out of your home network
  • Block the incoming traffic from non-genuine places
  • Block traffic to and from malicious websites
  • Tag all the devices being used in the network
  • Keep your wireless network secured with a strong password
  • Setup network alarming system

To start, lets go ahead with the above points one by one

Analise all the network traffic going out of your home network

It is a good way to get started with an analysis of the traffic of the home network first. Say, if I am living n India and the traffic hitting my home network is from China and Pakistan, it is something non-useful for me. This type of analysis can make out good results in securing and blocking traffic to and from such networks.

The analysis should include the following points

  • Which device is sending traffic outside the network
  • Where the data is being sent and received
  • Is the IP to which the data is being sent or received under the risk category (You can check the reputation on https://talosintelligence.com/)
  • Are there any unknown devices connected to the network?
  • Is something unusual happening in the traffic flow of the network?

Block the incoming traffic from non-genuine places

Once you have done the analysis, you will be well known about the sources that are malicious, and that do not require either send traffic to or from the network. You can start blocking the IP addresses that you find malicious.

If you have small children in your house and you want to have a bit of parental control over the data usage, or you don’t want them to surf illegal content like pornographic data, etc. you can do it by simply blocking such category of the website in the Firewall and setting up data usage policy for your children devices. All the facilities are available in the “MythGuard MGF001 – Mini Firewall

You can even block countries, IP range, Category wise domain names, etc. to secure the data access to and from your home network.

Block traffic to and from malicious websites

Blocking traffic to and from malicious websites is the same concept as discussed above, the difference is, you can do this by simply selecting the blocking feature generally available in all the Next Generation Firewall (NGFW). Firewalls not only block the traffic from malicious websites (blocking will include blocking of surfing, downloading, and uploading of data) but also, keep on updating the list of malicious websites.

The list gets updated and hence your network stays updated too. Security from such websites keeps you away from attacks like ransomware attacks, spoofing, phishing, etc.

Tag all the devices being used in the network

Tagging devices means, adding them to the network by binding them via MAC address. It is generally one of the best ways to secure your network. In your home network, you can evaluate the total number of devices that actually require an internet connection, and then you can connect them to the network, after connecting them to the network either via wired or wireless modes, you should bind the IP address to the MAC address of each device and block other devices to join the network.

Binding MAC address to the devices will lead to NO ADDITIONAL DEVICE in the network and thus, your wireless and wired network will be more secure, as no one standing outside your home accessing your wireless network range will be able to connect to your network. Even if he/she has the password of your wireless network.

Binding devices will also give you additional features like bandwidth motoring, access control, bandwidth control, etc.

Keep your wireless network secured with a strong password

A strong password policy is always required to keep the network secure. You should always keep a strong password for your wireless network and should always keep updating it regularly. The more complex the password is, the harder it is to guess.

A strong password also secures you from attacks like, dictionary attack, etc.

You should ensure that all the devices in the network, where ever there is a need for password protection, should have a custom password. You should not leave any of the devices on its default password setup. It can cause loopholes in your network.

Setup network alarming system

Setup an alarming system to keep yourself updated if there are any problems in your network. NGFWs have features to provide you Email and SMS-based alarms in case of different situations. You can set up alarms in situations like high bandwidth usage, network failure, a new device added to the network, etc.

This will help you monitor your home network even if you are not at your home or if you are not consistently monitoring your network. The more alarms your setup, the more secure your network will be. You will get more insights into your network.

Conclusion

Concluding the above, it is always suggested to keep your home network secure as we are adding up multiple devices for either personal use or home automation on regular basis. If your home network gets compromised, it can lead to severe consequences. Take a step today and go ahead securing your home network.

You can get in touch with us if in case you require any help in securing your network. Click here to discuss with us.

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)

What is RDP?

RDP, also known as the Remote Desktop Protocol is a specially designed tool to access and use a remote desktop over intranet or internet using some specific port.

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a proprietary protocol developed by Microsoft, which provides a user with a graphical interface to connect to another computer over a network connection. The user employs RDP client software for this purpose, while the other computer must run RDP server software.

5 Benefits of Using RDP:

  1. Deliver solutions to devices that may not have the processing power or capacity to run the applications natively.
  2. Deliver Windows based applications to iOS, Android, Windows and even thin client devices.
  3. Provide more compute resources to an application without having to upgrade everyone’s devices. This gives you the ability to reduce the cost of the end user devices knowing that when users need more compute power, the compute power can be associated with the actual workloads that need it.
  4. Data can be stored in the cloud. If the end user device fails, or is lost or stolen, your data remains safe.
  5. Configuration time is greatly reduced for new devices. Since the applications or desktop are delivered from the cloud and not are not stored on the local device, once a new device is setup, users can just reconnect to their remote apps or desktops and go back to work.

Features of RDP

  • 32-bit color support. 8-, 15-, 16-, and 24-bit color are also supported.
  • 128-bit encryption, using the RC4 encryption algorithm, as of Version 6.. TLS support since version 5.2.
  • Audio Redirection allows users to process audio on a remote desktop and have the sound redirected to their local computer.
  • File System Redirection allows users to use their local files on a remote desktop within the terminal session.
  • Printer Redirection allows users to use their local printer within the terminal session as they would with a locally- or network-shared printer.
  • Port Redirection allows applications running within the terminal session to access local serial and parallel ports directly.
  • The remote computer and the local computer can share the clipboard.

Microsoft introduced the following features with the release of RDP 6.0 in 2006:

  • Seamless Windows: remote applications can run on a client machine that is served by a Remote Desktop connection. It is available since RDP 6.
  • Remote Programs: application publishing with client-side file-type associations.
  • Terminal Services Gateway: enables the ability to use a front-end IIS server to accept connections (over port 443) for back-end Terminal Services servers via an https connection, similar to how RPC over https allows Outlook clients to connect to a back-end Exchange 2003 server. Requires Windows Server 2008.
  • Network Level Authentication
  • Support for remoting the Aero Glass Theme (or Composed Desktop), including ClearType font-smoothing technology.
  • Support for remoting Windows Presentation Foundation applications: compatible clients that have .NET Framework 3.0 support can display full Windows Presentation Foundation effects on a local machine.
  • Rewrite of device redirection to be more general-purpose, allowing a greater variety of devices to be accessed.
  • Fully configurable and scriptable via Windows Management Instrumentation.
  • Improved bandwidth tuning for RDP clients.
  • Support for Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 on both server and client ends (can be negotiated if both parties agree, but not mandatory in a default configuration of any version of Windows).
  • Multiple monitor support for allowing one session to use multiple monitors on the client (disables desktop composition)

Release 7.1 of RDP in 2010 introduced the following feature:

  • RemoteFX: RemoteFX provides virtualized GPU support and host-side encoding; it ships as part of Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Myths About RDP!

As the use of RDP increased, it increased the myths about the RDP too. So we gathered some studies that are officially confirmed by Microsoft RDP team too, and have jotted down 10 myths about RDP

1) RDP is pretty slow because it has to scrape the screen and can only send giant bitmaps

This is a common misconception. While many alternative protocols are principally screen scrapers, RDP uses sophisticated techniques to get much better performance than can be obtained with a simple screen scraping approach.

To drill into this it helps to first talk a little about what screen scraping really means (i.e. what RDP does not do today) and why it can be slow:
In a screen scraping protocol the server side has to ‘poll’ screen contents frequently to see if anything has changed. Screen scraping polling involves frequent and costly memory ‘scrapes’ of screen content and then scanning through a lot of memory (a typical 1600×1200 by 32bpp screen is about 7MB of data) to see what parts may have changed. This burns up a lot of CPU cycles and leaves the protocol with few options but to send large resulting bitmaps down to the client.

So what does RDP do different today and why is it faster?

RDP uses presentation virtualization to enable a much better end-user experience, scalability and bandwidth utilization. RDP plugs into the Windows graphics system the same way a real display driver does, except that, instead of being a driver for a physical video card, RDP is a virtual display driver. Instead of sending drawing operations to a physical hardware GPU, RDP makes intelligent decisions about how to encode those commands into the RDP wire format. This can range from encoding bitmaps to, in many cases, encoding much smaller display commands such as “Draw line from point 1 to point 2” or “Render this text at this location.”

To illustrate some of the benefits on CPU load, terminal servers today can scale to many hundreds of users. In some of our scalability tests we see that even with hundreds of users connecting to one server running knowledge worker apps (e.g. Word, Outlook, Excel) the total CPU load consumed by RDP to encode and transmit the graphics is only a few percent of the whole system CPU load!

With this approach RDP avoids the costs of screen scraping and has a lot more flexibility in encoding the display as either bitmaps or a stream of commands to get the best possible performance.

2) RDP uses a lot of bandwidth

In many common and important scenarios such as knowledge worker applications and line of business app centralization RDP’s bandwidth usage is very low (on the order of Kbps per user depending on the app and scenario).

This is certainly much lower than many of the screen scraping approaches can hope to achieve (see point #1 above). More importantly it’s low enough that it provides a good experience for many users sharing the same network and datacenter infrastructure even when over a slow network.

So why has there been a perception that RDP uses a lot of bandwidth?

This is a good question and the answer probably lies in the fact that RDP does not use a constant amount of bandwidth; it actually tries to reduce bandwidth usage to 0 when nothing is changing on the screen. Bandwidth consumption only goes up in proportion to what is changing on screen. For instance, if you just run a line of business app with basic graphics and not much animation you may end up sending just a few Kbps of bandwidth down the wire. Of course if you start running animation-heavy applications or graphics your bandwidth usage will go up to support that scenario.

So let’s illustrate some sample bandwidth usages for RDP6.1 in common scenarios (data is from the RDP Performance Whitepaper ).

RDP bandwidth usage chart

Your mileage will vary depending on your application and network conditions, so it’s important to actually measure empirically for your scenario but the whitepaper gives useful general trends.

3) Myth: I can’t get the same rich experience I get locally when working over RDP

This is also a misconception. RDP provides a scalable remoting experience. By default it cuts down on rich effects in the desktop and application experience in order to preserve bandwidth and save on server load (e.g. CPU, memory). However, if you want the highest end user experience it is possible to turn on many rich effects and display enhancements such as:

  • · ClearType
  • · Wallpaper
  • · The Aero theme with full glass and 3D effects (when connecting to Vista with RDP 6.1)
  • · 32-bit per pixel color

The key to enabling many of these effects is to run the Remote Desktop client, click Options, and then click the Experience tab. Here you can select and enable many high-end features. Note that in some cases your admin might have controlled access to these features with server-side group policies.

In many cases you can get a great end user experience with good parity to the local case.

We’re also constantly working to ‘close the gap’ between the local and remote experience and so we’re looking to improve the remote experience even more in future versions.

4) RDP can’t be tuned to get better performance

This is again a misconception. RDP has a set of defaults that tries to provide the best balance between bandwidth usage, the remote user experience, and server scalability. However, you can override many settings if you want to manually tune for a specific scenario and in some cases get very significant boosts in performance.

TIP: One of my favorite such settings is the ability to set policy on the server to optimize RDP compression. This can give you a boost of as much as 60% bandwidth improvement over previous versions of RDP. The tradeoff here is that you’d be consuming more server resources (such as memory and possibly CPU) to achieve that bandwidth reduction.

The GP to control this is :

Administrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsTerminal ServicesTerminal ServerRemote Session Environment“Set compression algorithm for RDP data”

There is more information on tuning the bulk compressor as well as other RDP-tunable parameters such as cache sizes in the RDP Performance Whitepaper .

5) Using lower color depths — e.g. 8bpp — gives the best end user experience

This is a common misconception and was historically true, but not anymore!

The first version of RDP only supported 8bpp color. However, ever since Windows XP, RDP has supported up to 32bpp color.

The reason for this is that more and more apps have come to expect 32bpp mode as the default. Even the Windows Aero experience requires it.

Rather than deny this trend and create a difference between the local and remote experiences, we put a lot of effort into optimizing the 32bpp case to bring down its cost. This allows the user to have the flexibility to pick what is best for their scenario without necessarily having to incur a much bigger bandwidth cost.

In general I’d recommend attempting to run your scenario at 32bpp and measuring the resulting bandwidth to see if it’s acceptable for your scenario. It will usually give the best visual experience and in several cases will consume only a small percentage more data than 16bpp.

6) RDP is insecure; there is no encryption

To be clear, this is totally false! RDP has always supported strong encryption and is by default encrypted!

What has changed over the releases is the type of encryption we offer. The very first versions of RDP back in the Windows 2000 era had encryption that was based on SSL.

As early as Windows 2003 SP1 RDP we decided to introduce full-blown standards-based encryption (i.e. the same SSL as your browser uses to connect to your bank). SP1 did this by introducing standard SSL-encryption as an option.

Current versions of RDP have even stronger encryption and server authentication options out of the box. This is because they are built on top of a security mechanism in Windows called CredSSP which uses Kerberos or TLS (aka SSL) for authentication – when you use those settings RDP is using the same or stronger encryption that your browser uses when communicating with your bank.

7) RDP performance hasn’t changed much over the releases

False! We’re constantly working to improve RDP performance as well as adding a lot of great functionality to RDP in terms of features.

Every release since Windows 2000 has seen improved perf, i.e. there is a real benefit to upgrading to the latest client and server (e.g. RDP 6.1).

Here’s just one example of the bandwidth difference for a common scenario across several releases of RDP. We essentially have in these scenarios gains of between 8% to 45% bandwidth improvement from switching to the latest protocol. See the RDP Performance Whitepaper for more details on this data.

Going forward – We’re hard at work to continue that trend and bring even better innovations and improved remote experiences – see Asael’s post on some of the future upcoming improvements.

8) RDP is only used in Remote Desktop Services (formerly TS)

RDP is actually used under the hood in pretty much every Microsoft product that benefits from desktop or application remoting.

Just some examples of products or features you may not have known were built on top of RDP for their remoting needs:

  • · Remote Assistance
  • · Windows Media Center Extenders use RDP internally (including Xbox360)
  • · Windows Live Mesh
  • · Hyper-V Virtual Machine console
  • · Office Communications Server 2007 R2
  • · System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

If you’re interesting in seeing how RDP might be able to fit within your application, see the next point…

9)I can’t customize or program extensions to RDP

There are actually several useful ways to extend/or customize RDP:

  • · Programming the RDP Client: Host the RDP ActiveX control in your web page or application.

The Remote Desktop client in Windows is a great example of an application that hosts the RDP ActiveX control. This control is fully documented in MSDN . It’s possible for 3 rd party software developers to host this control in an app or a web page to provide desktop remoting as part of your larger app.

· Programming the RDP Server side: Use the Windows Desktop Sharing API

This blog post by Seenu has a lot of good detail and examples on how you can use our Windows Desktop Sharing API to write custom collaboration or desktop sharing applications, these APIs are all built on the same core RDP protocol that powers Windows Remote Desktop.

· Write a dynamic virtual channel extension to RDP

Probably the most powerful way to extend RDP is to actually write a virtual channel plug-in extension to RDP. This allows you to extend the protocol with your own bi-directional channel that can communicate from client to server. The possibilities are limitless but some examples include supporting new devices over RDP. We have a nice blog post with an overview of the dynamic virtual channel API or the docs are in MSDN .

10)The RDP protocol is not publicly documented

If you’re curious to learn more about very low-level technical details of RDP, we have thousands of pages of detailed specifications up on MSDN. For example, you can see the documents for the core protocol sequence and basic graphics here .

Moving forward,

Are you looking to setup a RDP?

Our team can help you setting up a Remote Desktop at cheaper rates and provide you a highly available PC.

You can opt to get a Remote Desktop by connecting with us here

Virtual Private Network (VPN)

Virtual Private Networks are the new age technologies which allows you to bring you to your Local Area Network (LAN) whenever you need it. A VPN can be used to get access to an office / home network in a more secure way.

VPN, as its name suggests, creates a private network over internet. It uses high end encryption technologies to secure data transfer over internet, while it also provides you with the access of you remote local area network.
Read more about VPN here

Who uses VPN?

We have jotted down small list of the people who commonly use VPN’s, along with the specific benefits they experience from it. Chances are, you fall at least partially into one of the categories below.

Office Workers

While you are using a open network or your own personal WiFi connection, you can be at risk . Other people can have access to your activities and may even be able to steal your account information. business data, research data, etc. which can lead to risk of job or grades.

Generally, companies provide VPN to their employees so that they have easy access to data and connection, even while traveling, to the resources that they might not have in another network. If you are using a VPN even in public places, you can rest assured that your important work is protected from prying eyes and your data is safe. Office workers use VPN on a large scale based on different reasons.

Security Enthusiasts

No matter your profession or internet needs, you deserve the privacy and security that a VPN can provide. Using a VPN, you can:

  • Search anonymously without the threat of your activity being traced or tracked
  • Keep your network safe from hacking by identity thieves, malware, and/or neighbors who don’t want to pay for their own Internet
  • Get a secure connection so that your communications remain private and encrypted, whether you’re at home or in a public space
  • Shield your personal and financial data from prying eyes

So if your neighbor keeps pilfering your internet, possibly even downloading viruses or malware to your server, or if your teenager accidentally entered your credit card information into a suspicious site, or even if you’re just uncomfortable with the idea of anyone seeing your personal data or online activity, you should be using a VPN.

Travelers

Because of time differences, language barriers, and government censorship, internet use while abroad can be slow and frustrating. Rather than relying on an unfamiliar, unsecured local network, using a VPN while traveling eliminates those hurdles (as well as any security issues) and allows you to access any website at the speed you want in the language you want.

Businesses and Websites

Whether you own a small startup or are part of a large corporation, VPNs help secure private business data. From scheduling, payroll, product catalogs, employee and customer information, company projections, and more, your data is protected and secure. Companies commonly use VPNs for privacy reasons, but also for secure and convenient data sharing between offices, and for connecting remote employees to central work servers. Websites use them to prevent malware from affecting its users and to ensure a fast load time.

People everywhere are using VPNs, and the numbers are growing. With increasing censorship, cyber crime, and speed demands, VPNs save the day for students, businesses, travelers, downloaders, and regular people.

Types of VPN

There are two major type of VPN

  • Site to Site VPN – Also known as Router to Router VPN or Peer to Peer VPN. This type of VPN is used by companies to connect with different branch offices. In this scenario, all the branches of the company comes in a single network, which makes it easy for lot of tasks to take place. Generally, companies use Pees to Peer VPN for the following:
    • File sharing over private and secured network
    • Providing access to equipment over private network
    • Access to LAN based certificates and licenses
    • Intranet communication
    • Inter office communication / connection
Site to Site VPN
  • Remote Access VPN – A remote-access VPN allows individual users to establish secure connections with a remote computer network. Those users can access the secure resources on that network as if they were directly plugged in to the network’s servers. Generally organizations having field staff who report over intranet tools are provided with the remote access VPN. Organization use the remote access VPN to allow users:
    • Access files
    • Access resources
    • Reporting
    • Monitoring
    • Internet access
    • Server sharing
Remote Access VPN

If you are owner of a business, and you require a better and a secure connection for your employees. High availability of your intranet resources and data. Then you should opt for getting a Virtual Private Netowrk setup. This will not only protect your data but also enhance the productivity of your workforce.

Even in situations like #CoronaEffect, your office will be up and running. Your workforce will be working from home over your own office network.

To get your VPN setup done. You can connect with use anytime. Just write to us, or give us a call. Get our contact details here

How to secure your office / home WiFi router?

There has been a huge growth in use of internet through different mediums. One of the largely used one is WIFI. People now-a-days setup wifi connection at their homes and offices to use internet for different purpose. But they are unaware of the security risks of the same. An unsecured Wi-Fi router running on the default manufacturer settings could be a liability when it comes to hackers and Wi-Fi squatters accessing your private information and burdening your broadband.

If your Wi-Fi network isn’t secured properly — a public IP address, no unique Wi-Fi password — you could be letting anyone with a wireless-enabled device gain access. You might not be worried about someone using your wireless connection, but the real risk is exposing sensitive information you send and receive — your emails, banking information, and maybe even your smart home’s daily schedule — to cyber-criminals.

Basic router security
There should always be a strong password on every router to keep you secure from the bad guys out there.. Now a days, the routers come with default settings and default passwords, that work as plug and play systems, but you should change these passwords as soon as you start using them. Keep a note that a complex, unique, and tough to guess password will give you some good sort of security. It will take only some couple of minutes to set it up, you just need to follow the instructions, which varies router to router.


Depending on your router, you might have options for different kinds of encryption. The most common router encryption types are WEP, WPA and WPA2. Commercial routers from brands like Netgear, Linksys, and ASUS often include:

Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP): This is the oldest and most popular form of router encryption available. However, it is the least secure of all encryption protocols. It uses radio-waves that are easy to crack. For every data packet that is transmitted it uses the same encryption key. With the help of automated software, this information can easily be analyzed.

Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA): The Wi-Fi Alliance came up with WPA to offer an encryption protocol without the shortcomings of WEP. It scrambles the encryption key thereby getting rid of the problems caused by hackers cracking the radio-waves. This is also a less secure form of encryption, partly because of legacy hardware and firmware that still used WEP as their main protocol. However, it is a significant improvement over WEP.

Wi-Fi Protected Access 2 (WPA2): This encryption type is currently the most secure and most recent form of encryption available. You should always select WPA2 if it is available. It not only scrambles the encryption key but is also does not allow the use of Temporal Key Integrity Protocol or TKIP which is known to be less secure then AES.

Advanced Encryption Standard: When possible, you’ll want to use AES on top of WPA2 or WPA. This is the same type of encryption used by the federal government to secure classified information. Routers made after 2006 should have the option to enable this on top of WPA2.


Always follow the below rules:

Update your router with new firmware and keep it up to date
Updating your router’s firmware is an important security measure to help protect your router against the latest threats. Most modern routers allow you to enable notifications to prompt you when the manufacturer makes patches and updates to the router’s firmware available. Some manufacturers may even push the update automatically to your hardware, so you don’t have to do anything. However, there are some routers that have updates within the settings option. In this case, the user has to make sure that the firmware is manually updated regularly.

Change your login credentials and router password on regular basis
Traditional routers come with a default password created by the manufacturer. While it may look complex and resistant to hacking, there is a good chance most models of the same router share the same password. These passwords are often easy to trace or find on the internet. Make sure you change these passwords on setup and also ensure regular password update of your router.

Always use WPA2 to secure your wireless network
Wi-Fi Protected Access 2, better known as WPA2, is a commonly used network security technology used on wireless routers.

It is one of the most secure encryption options available in the market since 2006. WPA2 scrambles the traffic going in and out of the router. That means even if someone is within range and can see traffic, all they see is the encrypted version.

Disable WPS
Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) was created with the intention of making the user experience easier and quicker when connecting new devices to the network. It works on the idea that you press a button on the router and a button on the device. This makes both devices pair automatically.

The user has the option to use a personal identification number, or PIN, to setup the device to create a connection. This eliminates the use of the 16-character WPA password that most routers use.

However, because of the PIN, WPS earned a bad reputation for being insecure. The PIN is an eight-digit number that can easily be hacked by repeatedly using various combinations of the usernames and passwords. This is carried out with the help of software. This kind of an attack is called a brute force attack.

Most routers allow users to disable WPS. Even if the PIN option appears to be disabled, it is wise to disable WPS. In recent years, it was discovered that many routers from reputed manufacturers allowed PIN-based authentication even when it appeared to be disabled.

Get rid of any risky or unverified services
It would be wise to disable remote access to your router when you are actively connected to it.

Take UPnP, for example. Universal Plug and Play or UPnP is an easy way to allow devices to find other devices on your network. It can also alter the router to allow devices from other networks to access your device. However, it has helped hackers to introduce malware and viruses by making them bypass the firewall. Mirai Botnet is an example of one such attack.

Other router security helpers
Aside from your router settings and making sure to use your Wi-Fi network’s security features, there are some other options, like using a virtual private network, in addition to device security and identity theft protection in the form of all-in-one protection like the NEW Norton 360 with LifeLock.

Use a virtual private network or VPN
A virtual private network (VPN) encrypts connections between devices, creating online privacy and anonymity. A VPN can mask your internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections to provide greater privacy of the data you send and receive, even on secured Wi-Fi hotspots.

Always use a firewall
A firewall monitors incoming and outgoing network traffic and allows or blocks specific traffic. It is an important security feature to look for when selecting a router. For the online safety of your network and devices, it’s smart to never disable a firewall.

Install and use a strong antivirus and security software
Setting up security for your wireless network doesn’t take much time at all and will do much to help protect you against hackers. Cyber-criminals work tirelessly to gain access to your personal and financial information. A small investment in security software could go a long way.

Even if you don’t have neighbors you want to prevent from borrowing your Wi-Fi, you’ll be protecting yourself from more dangerous snoops. Especially now that so many homes are connected and various devices are using Wi-Fi, you’ll be wise to protect all of the information those devices contain. Don’t take chances. Just a few minutes of selecting the right home Wi-Fi router settings can mean all the difference to your connected world.

 If you are still worried about securing your network from invaders, and want to secure your network, or if you are looking for network security experts, get in touch with us today! our team will be happy helping you out.

We provide all sort of network setup, network security and data monitoring services.

For any service requirements, connect with us here

Network Maintenance

Network maintenance basically means you have to do what it takes in order to keep a network secure, up and running and it includes a number of tasks and we do exactly the same:

  • Troubleshooting network problems.
  • Hardware and software installation/configuration.
  • Monitoring and improving network performance.
  • Planning for future network growth.
  • Creating network documentation and keeping it up-to-date.
  • Ensuring compliance with company policies.
  • Ensuring compliance with legal regulations.
  • Securing the network against all kinds of threats.

Whatever network maintenance model you decide to use, there are always a number of routine maintenance tasks that should have listed procedures, here are a couple of examples:

  • Configuration changes
  • Replacement of hardware
  • Backups
  • Monitoring

Normally we will create a list with the tasks that have to be done for your network. These tasks can be assigned a certain priority. Making changes to your network will sometimes impact productivity of users who rely on the network availability. Some changes will have a huge impact, changes to firewalls or access-list rules might impact more users then you’d wish for.

Our team of expert keeps in mind the higher availability and stability of the network. We ensure lower downtime for maintenance and upgrades. Before any such activity, our team sets up the best planning and time-spans with proper communication for the same.

For any service related query, you can get in touch with us here

Network Planning and Setup

We help individuals and companies in planning and setting up their network. Our services includes Network planning, Hardware setup and configuration, Host configuration, Software configuration, Server deployment and lot more. All we do follows some major steps according to the companies’ / Individual’s requirements.

It is painful for companies and individuals to plan and setup a proper network which can satisfy their needs. But believe us, we will help you to setup it up and you will keep yourself away from that pain.

From our past experience we believe that while setting up a network, a proper planning is the major part. As planned networks satisfy the needs and keeps the work up without any hazels. A proper planned network is highly available, robust, scalable and provides connectivity to all authentic people keeping your data safe from outside world.

We help companies / individuals setting up intranet connection, internet connection, VPN, Security setup and lot more.
Ranging from sharing of devices over network to sharing of data, setting up policies, setting up access control, setting up hardwares and lot more. We provide all the services under one hood.

Companies always have a deep concern of security of data, we can understand the importance and need of it. That’s why we have a policy of security first while setting up any network.

For small businesses and individuals, setting up a router with plug and play functionality, should keep in mind that plug and play devices are vulnerable. For people who are looking for setting up their home / office network over simple router can go though the below blog which will guide you securing your home/office WiFi network.

How to secure your office / home WiFi router?

For offices which need

  • Secure network
  • Scalable network
  • Robust network
  • Who have need of high availability over secure connections like Virtual Private Network (VPN).
  • Who have a futuristic approach of handling their network and data.

Should opt for our network planning and setup services.

We ensure that all the required hardware and software are properly configured. Hardware ranging from routers, firewalls, access-points, switches, etc. are planned and configured by experts.

We have a team of highly experienced and highly certified professionals. We ensure proper service and solution for all kind of networking needs.

For further details, you can get in touch with us here

Network Security

Network security is any activity designed to protect the usability and integrity of your network and data.

  • It comprise both hardware and software technologies
  • It detects a variety of threats
  • It stops them from entering or spreading on your network
  • Effective network security manages access to the network

How is the network security process?

Network security combines multiple layers of defenses at the edge and in the network. Each network security layer implements policies and controls. Authorized users gain access to network resources, but malicious actors are blocked from carrying out exploits and threats.

How do you benefit from network security?

Every organization that wants to deliver the services that customers and employees demand must protect its network. Network security also helps you protect proprietary information from attack. Ultimately it protects your reputation.

But most importantly, when it comes to network security solutions, the big question that arises is – WHAT ALL SERVICES DO WE NEED FOR SECURING DATA OVER NETWORK? Right?? So we are here with the answer you need to know before taking any wrong step. When you are working on the internet or on any intranet, or over other connections like VPN etc. you can opt for the following services that fall under network and data security. Namely:

  • Firewalls
  • VPN
  • Application security
  • Access control
  • Email security
  • Behavioral analytics
  • Data loss prevention
  • Intrusion prevention systems
  • Mobile device security
  • Security information and event management
  • Web security
  • Wireless security
  • Network segmentation
  • Anti-virus and anti-malware software

Firewalls

Firewalls put up a barrier between your trusted internal network and non-trusted outside networks, such as the Internet. They use a set of defined rules to allow or block traffic. A firewall can be hardware, software, or both.

VPN

A virtual private network encrypts the connection from an endpoint to a network, often over the Internet. Typically, a remote-access VPN uses IPsec or Secure Sockets Layer to authenticate the communication between device and network.

Application security

Any software you use to run your business needs to be protected, whether your IT staff builds it or whether you buy it. Unfortunately, any application may contain holes, or vulnerabilities, that attackers can use to infiltrate your network. Application security encompasses the hardware, software, and processes you use to close

Access control

Not every user should have access to your network. To keep out potential attackers, you need to recognize each user and each device. Then you can enforce your security policies. You can block non-compliant endpoint devices or give them only limited access. This process is network access control (NAC).

Email security

Email gateways are the number one threat vector for a security breach. Attackers use personal information and social engineering tactics to build sophisticated phishing campaigns to deceive recipients and send them to sites serving up malware. An email security application blocks incoming attacks and controls outbound messages to prevent the loss of sensitive data.

Behavioral analytics

To detect abnormal network behavior, you must know what normal behavior looks like. Behavioral analytics tools automatically discern activities that deviate from the norm. Your security team can then better identify indicators of compromise that pose a potential problem and quickly remediate threats.

Data loss prevention

Organizations must make sure that their staff does not send sensitive information outside the network. Data loss prevention, or DLP, technologies can stop people from uploading, forwarding, or even printing critical information in an unsafe manner.

Intrusion prevention systems

An intrusion prevention system (IPS) scans network traffic to actively block attacks. It not only blocks malicious activity but also tracks the progression of suspect files and malware across the network to prevent the spread of outbreaks and reinfection.

Mobile device security

Mobile security automatically and remotely deletes your data on lost devices. Mobile security prevents you from losing your phone containing vital personal or business data. To prevent the loss of company or personal data, an excellent mobile security solution will be able to erase data stored in your phone. You need to control which devices can access your network. You will also need to configure their connections to keep network traffic private.

Security information and event management

SIEM products pull together the information that your security staff needs to identify and respond to threats. These products come in various forms, including physical and virtual appliances and server software.

Web security

A web security solution will control your staff’s web use, block web-based threats, and deny access to malicious websites. It will protect your web gateway on site or in the cloud. “Web security” also refers to the steps you take to protect your own website.

Wireless security

Wireless networks are not as secure as wired ones. Without stringent security measures, installing a wireless LAN can be like putting Ethernet ports everywhere, including the parking lot. To prevent an exploit from taking hold, you need products specifically designed to protect a wireless network.

Network segmentation

Software-defined segmentation puts network traffic into different classifications and makes enforcing security policies easier. Ideally, the classifications are based on endpoint identity, not mere IP addresses. You can assign access rights based on role, location, and more so that the right level of access is given to the right people and suspicious devices are contained and remediated.

Anti-virus and anti-malware software

These software are used for protection against malware, which includes spyware, ransomware, Trojans, worms, and viruses. Malware can also become very dangerous as it can infect a network and then remain calm for days or even weeks. These software handles this threat by scanning for malware entry and regularly tracks files afterward in order to detect anomalies, remove malware, and fix damage.